Warning: mysql_query(): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock' (2) in /hsphere/local/home/virtualmel/keepingtraditions.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/astickypostorderer/astickypostorderer.php on line 166 Warning: mysql_query(): A link to the server could not be established in /hsphere/local/home/virtualmel/keepingtraditions.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/astickypostorderer/astickypostorderer.php on line 166 Warning: mysql_query(): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock' (2) in /hsphere/local/home/virtualmel/keepingtraditions.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/astickypostorderer/astickypostorderer.php on line 203 Warning: mysql_query(): A link to the server could not be established in /hsphere/local/home/virtualmel/keepingtraditions.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/astickypostorderer/astickypostorderer.php on line 203 Warning: mysql_query(): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock' (2) in /hsphere/local/home/virtualmel/keepingtraditions.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/astickypostorderer/astickypostorderer.php on line 231 Warning: mysql_query(): A link to the server could not be established in /hsphere/local/home/virtualmel/keepingtraditions.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/astickypostorderer/astickypostorderer.php on line 231 April 2011 - Keeping Traditions News & Learning Center

Rewritten Pedigrees

On April 27, 2011, in Articles about Angora Rabbits, by tina

Last year I discovered that a local breeder that had received many hybrid German angora rabbits from my farm had rewritten my pedigrees to misrepresent them as purebred Giant angoras.   So to prevent this from happening again I want to state here that all my original pedigrees now will be signed by myself and stamped with  Keeping Traditions Pedigree on each pedigree form- this way its known this is the original copy. All pedigrees written will be photocopied and kept in a file so information will be available for verification to try to prevent this from happening again. If anyone has a question on a pedigree (especially a Giant  angora) under the name Cameron you can email and I will try to verify what is correct to the best of my knowledge.

Tagged with:
 

Different Types Of Wool For Knitting

On April 26, 2011, in Spinning, by tina

 

Wool usually comes from sheep, but it can also come from rabbits, goats and llamas. There are many different types of wool, but they all share certain characteristics. The most important characteristic is that it easily absorbs moisture. It can absorb up to 30 percent of its weight without feeling wet, plus the moisture content in the wool helps to prevent a build-up of static electricity. Wool will keep you warmer than other fibres. Wool is also very elastic and can easily be stretched when wet; yet it is still able to return to its normal shape once it is dry. All of these factors make it very comfortable to wear. The following is an explanation of the different types of wool that can be used for knitting. Angora wool is a light, natural fibre that is grown only by angora rabbits. The wool can be gathered in two ways. The first way is to comb the rabbit at least once a week. While time consuming, this method produces superior quality fleece, as guard hair is not gathered. The second way is to shear the rabbit, much like a sheep. This method is less time consuming and yields a larger quantity of fleece. It has been found that angora wool is up to three times warmer than sheep wool. Cashmere wool is extremely soft. It comes from Cashmere goats, which can be combed or sheared. If the goat is sheared, the coarse guard hair must be removed. Since both methods are time consuming, cashmere is very expensive. Llama wool is one of the finest wools that you can find. It comes from the llama’s undercoat, which is very fine, unlike the llama’s coarse outer guard hair. Like angora goats and rabbits, llamas can be sheared or brushed in order to gather this fine undercoat. Llama wool is not commonly used and can be hard to find. Merino wool comes from Merino sheep. It is the finest and softest of all wool that comes from sheep. It is easy to dye and comes in a wide range of colours, from pastels to bright shades to multi-colour strands. Most Merino wool comes from Australia and New Zealand, with Australia producing about 43 percent of the world’s supply. Mohair wool is grown on Angora goats. The mohair is shorn from the goat twice a year, once in spring and once in fall. Mohair is noted for its high lustre and sheen, as well as being very durable. Like angora wool, mohair is very warm and absorbs moisture. Tip: When washing clothing made from wool, use net bags. Place the clothing item in the net bag, then place it in the washer in the delicate cycle. When the wash is done, hang or lay flat to dry. This works even for clothes that say to hand wash only.

Please visit http://www.beautifulcreations.ca./Needlework/Needlework.htm to see the latest trends in wool. While you are there, check out our free newsletter and project ideas!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Joanne_Jones

Tagged with: