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Newborn German Angora Babies

On May 23, 2015, in Rabbits for Sale, News, by tina

Its nearing the end of May and a couple of brand new litters have just arrived on the farm – all pure German angora rabbits.

Newborn German angoras

Newborn German angoras

Just hours old

Just hours old

 

 

 

 

 

 

I will be retaining some of these babies and have a waiting list started for the others.

When you are ready to start breeding angora rabbits its important to make sure the doe is in good condition first. Check her over good to make sure their is no signs of illness or health issues. I like to  shear the doe first but always leave a little length to wool, and by the time the babies arrive her wool is a good length for nest making. If shearing is not an option the doe can be clipped underneath before she kindles, but try to do this before its too close to due date.  Another thing to check is to make sure the doe is eating well. A good pellet ration along with a handful of grass hay is a balanced meal for the angora rabbit. I give a measured amount of pellets each day. If I see pellets are all cleaned up and the rabbit is eagerly waiting I know they are happy and healthy. If pellets are left behind for several days it gives me a signal something may be wrong with the rabbit.  Treats are alright  but give it in small amounts and not to often. You want a doe that is a good weight for her breed type so she doesn’t have problems with kindling. If the doe is healthy its time to take her to the bucks cage. Let the breeding take place once or twice and then the doe can be removed and taken back to her cage. I do not leave the doe in with the buck for any length of time. For one thing I like to know the due date of when to expect the litter. I also have know of some instances where does attacked the bucks enough to cause life threatening injuries. So I always stay near by and remove the doe back to her own cage. If the breeding was not successful, wait a few days and try again. Sometimes the scent of the buck will help get the doe ready for breeding. Write down the day of the breeding and count 31 days from that date. This will give you an idea of when to expect the litter. Remember though they could come a few days earlier or later. Make sure about a week before to place a nest box in with the doe if their are no drop nest boxes in the cage. Provide nesting material, straw being a great choice. A few days before the doe is due I reduce the pellet ration down about a third to half, and keep it that way until she kindles. After the birth I slowly bring the pellets up to full amount over a few days. I do this to help reduce the chance of getting ketosis. I once lost a doe to this and learned this is the way to help prevent it. As the babies start growing the doe will need pellets increased. Do this slowly- to  much to fast could cause the doe to get mastitis. As the babies start opening their eyes they will slowly discover pellets and hay. Around 6-7 weeks old they should be eating well enough on their own and the doe will have weaned them completely. Around this time the doe can be placed in a cage of her own and the babies can stay together for a while. By 8 weeks they can placed in their new homes.

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